Innovation grants from CEMPE

CEMPE has awarded innovation grants of up to NOK 50,000 to four development projects for the 2015/2016 academic year. The funds will be used to explore and develop higher music performance education.

Two of the funding awards went to faculty members at the Norwegian Academy of Music, while two went to external projects. The four projects are presented below.

Kristin Kjølberg (NAM)  is looking to continue her project on co-operative learning using the Critical Response Process. This project falls under CEMPE's focus area Teaching Principal Instrument in Groups.   Kjølberg says:

By practising and using the methodology, we as teachers and peers can practise awareness of the language we use in our teaching, of the position we assume as teachers, and of how to use open and neutral questioning to initiate processes that are conducive to the development of our students' artistic identities.

 

...we as teachers and peers can practise awareness of the language we use in our teaching


Bjørn Løken and Håkon Kvidal (NAM)  are looking to develop the  flipped classroom whereby they make internet-based instruction videos available to the students. The intention is for students to study the material in depth before meeting their teachers or to revise the material after the lesson. You can see an example of an instruction video by Bjørn Løken below.

https://youtu.be/C4RvGLaVthM

Løken and Kvidal says:

The use of new media and internet-based learning resources allow for new ways of learning. By making knowledge available in the form of instruction videos and by organising the tuition as a “flipped classroom”, we can further develop principal instrument tuition and improve the quality of the students' own practice methods.

 

 

 

 

The use of new media and internet-based learning resources allow for new ways of learning.


Morten Wensberg (University of Stavanger)  wishes to try out new technology as a tool for conducting students at the University of Stavanger. The students will be able to video their own conducting and then evaluate their technique with the help of so-called telestrator technology, i.e. freehand graphics superimposed on a video image. Wensberg says:

The opportunity to freely draw graphics on top of the video image will help make it easier to illustrate and measure technical conducting parameters. ... We believe that the introduction of new technology will increase the benefits to students and that it will make a permanent and lasting contribution to student-active learning, to learning outcomes and to the quality of the conducting course.

 

 

 

 

...the introduction of new technology ... will make a permanent and lasting contribution to student-active learning, to learning outcomes and to the quality of the conducting course.

[caption id="attachment_266" align="alignnone" width="1000"] Photo: NAM Photo: NAM[/caption]


Kåre Bjørkøy (NTNU)  is looking to explore stage direction as an integrated part of the training for classical singers. He aims to investigate pedagogic strategies that bridge the gap between the technical and the story-telling aspects of training young singers. Bjørkøy says:

My own experience shows that many students focus so hard on the technical aspects of their singing that it affects their ability to convey the music in an emotional, dynamic and personal manner. ... By introducing an element of stage direction, the voice students will instinctively focus more on their stage character than on their own singing technique. This method is likely to improve the students' ability to regulate their breathing through the body's reflexes such as sighing, laughing, gasping and crying.

 

 

 

 

By introducing an element of stage direction, the voice students will instinctively focus more on their stage character than on their own singing technique.

 

 

Last updated: 3. June 2015